Monthly Archives: September 2015

‘Wolves and Apples’ panel discussions.

Two panel discussions will top and tail our ‘Wolves and Apples’ event on October 3rd.
WHY WRITE FOR CHILDREN?
10:15-11:00

The opening discussion will introduce the event and our guest speakers and touch on some key aspects of creating work for children and young adults.

Possible Areas of Discussion.

  • How and why did the panel begin writing for children and young adults?
  • What are we trying to achieve by creating work for young audiences?
  • What are the pitfalls and advantages of working in this area?
  • More girls than boys read. Does that matter and how does it affect the choices one makes as a writer?

Q and A.
The panel will end with an opportunity to ask questions of our speakers.

A WRITING CAREER
16:00-16:50

The closing discussion will be focused on professional development for writers. Collectively the panel has experience of publishing, writing, producing, directing, show running, and representing writers.

Potential Areas of Discussion.

  • Developing a viable career: not putting all your eggs in one basket.
  • Understanding how different industries (e.g. Theatre, publishing, TV) operate and work with writers.
  • Presenting and submitting your work – best practice.
  • Where to get further advice, support and help.
  • Dos, don’ts and next steps.

Q and A
The discussion will end with a final opportunity to ask questions of our speakers.

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3 question interview: Debbie Moon

Here is the fourth micro interview with guests who will be speaking at our upcoming  Wolves and Apples event. Wolfblood’s Debbie Moon answers our three searching questions.

1. What was your favourite book when you were a child, and why?
The Grey King, by Susan Cooper. A heady mix of Welsh myth and legends in a 1970’s setting, full of dark lords, strange boys with golden eyes, magical creatures, and a powerful sense of the landscape of north-west Wales. It had such a profound impact on me that I ended up moving to Wales as an adult!

2. What is your top writing tip?
The best advice I was ever give was “don’t get it right, get it written”. A completed story gives you security. You can rewrite, reorganise, throw out whole sections, and yet always have the original version to refer to or revert to. A half-written story can’t be polished or perfected, because you don’t know what it is yet. So get it finished, however terrible you think it is, and then you can whip it into shape.

3. What is the best thing about writing for children?
Probably their enthusiasm for stories. Children experience so much of the wider world through stories, and they embrace them passionately, and get very attached to characters and relationships within them. Adults may treat television as wallpaper, there but ignored: children almost never do.

 

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3 question interview: Jonathan Emmett

Here is the third of our micro interviews with our Wolves and Apples guests. This time it’s the turn of picture book author Jonathan Emmett to answer three questions.

1. What was your favourite book when you were a child, and why?
I had lots, but the one I usually single out is Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak. As an adult I can appreciate that it’s beautifully illustrated with a deftly written text that reads wonderfully aloud, but as a four-year-old it was the sheer nightmarish scariness of the Wild Things, with their “terrible roars”, “terrible teeth”, “terrible eyes” and “terrible claws” that drew me in. Their wildness was in stark contrast to the tameness of most other picture book characters then and now. The book was criticised by parents and withheld from libraries for being “too dark” when it was first published, but that darkness is hugely appealing to many children.

2. What is your top writing tip?
Always try to finish what you start. You might not be happy with what you end up with, but you will gain useful experience for your next project.

3. What is the best thing about writing for children?
You’re writing for an open-minded audience that has no preconceptions or prejudices about what you should and should not do in a book. So, generally speaking, you can be more playful and creative when writing for children.
And, if you can write books that children will enjoy reading, you’ll be helping to give those children a head start in life. Research has shown that children that read for pleasure do better in maths, vocabulary and spelling than those who rarely read and consequently gain advantages that last their whole lives.

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